ADDISON ROAD - HAMMERSMITH

(1869-1916)

 

This line is approaching the centenary of being closed to passenger service.
It ran from Addison Road to Richmond, providing through services from Waterloo to Richmond.

District and Piccadilly Line services now use the section between (a point just west of) Hammersmith and Richmond but the other section was abandoned - details below.

 

 

 

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The line diverged a quarter of a mile north of Addison Road (now Olympia) station on the West London line, following a semi circular route.

This photo is looking south at the line coming up from Addison Rd. On the left, mainly obscured, is the existing West London line. In the middle, the long-gone railway that caused the row of houses on the right to be built following the line of its divergence.

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

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Looking in the same direction but from slightly further north, back toward the bridge that the above photograph was taken from. The track area is clearly visible.

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

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Northern view from the above bridge, this photo shows the West London line on the right and the route of the abandoned line on the left, indicated by the left hand block of flats (actually a hotel).

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

 

 

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The road on top of the bridge (Addison Gardens). The bridge is obviously too long for just one set of tracks.

Those with astute observation may have noticed an example of White Van Driver Syndrome here: the driver of this van, somewhat lost and not wanting to go around the long way, decided to go through the no entry route, only to encounter a line of cars coming in the opposite direction. Disappointingly, he chose to reverse (there would have been far more entertainment value had he indulged in a punch-up instead!).

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

 

 

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The barely discernible hump in the road at Richmond Way indicating the line of the railway. The building on the left, built on the line of the railway, is the K West hotel, the back of which is visible on the right hand side of the photo above.

Why road humps survive when all other railway remains disappear is something of a mystery. One guess would be that levelling the road, along with all the utilities (gas, electricity, telephone, water) that run under the road surface, would be prohibitively expensive.

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

 

 

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The track bed below Rockley Road. The beam at the top is one of the joists holding the road up above it.

(photo: 2002)

 

 

 

 

 

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The hump on Shepherds Bush Road. The block of flats is built on the site of Shepherds Bush station. Despite being closed to passenger traffic in 1916, the station site survived until the late 1950s/early 1960s. That there was a station here, explains why the ground floor of those flats is well below the level of the road.

(photo: 2002)

 

 

 

 



Shepherds Bush station site in 2002.
The block of flats on the far side of the bridge is The Grampians, built in the 1930s on the line of the railway.

For a photo of the station in 1955, forty years after closure, move your mouse over the image above.

 

 

 

The site of Shepherd's Bush station as viewed from the bridge in the photo above.

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

 

 

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After Shepherds Bush station, the line ran underneath what is now the Hammersmith & City line just south of Goldhawk Road station. This view of that point is looking east.

(photo: 2002)

 

 

 

 

 

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From there it straightened and climbed onto a viaduct running between, and parallel to, the Hammersmith & City line and Hammersmith Grove.

Very little of that viaduct remains - this photo shows a section truncated at Trussley Road. There was a link between this line and what is now the Hammersmith & City line just south of here that allowed Metropolitan line access to Richmond.

(photo: 2002)

 

 

 

 

 

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View of the track bed leading back to the edge of the demolished bridge shown above.

(photo: 2002)

 

 

 

 

 

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A section of the raised track bed slightly further south from the photo above. This is the location of the junction with the Hammersmith & City line and presumably why the track bed is so wide here.

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

View of the area in the process of redevelopment in Feb 2009. For an approxmate indication of the route of the old track, move your cursor over the image.

Photo: Simon Hargrave. ©2009

 

 

 

Hammersmith station on the Hammersmith & City Line. This is the northern end of the platforms; the opposite end from the ticket office and exit. The seemingly pointless footway bridge here is the one that used to connect with Hammersmith Grove Road station.

(photo: 2007)

 

 

 

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South of Hammersmith Grove Road station, the route took a 90 degree turn so that it ran west toward Richmond, parallel with King Street (in fact the start of the turn was where Hammersmith Grove Road station was situated).

The small remnant shown here leads directly to the point where the District/Piccadilly tracks join it.

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

 

 

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It's very hard to make it out from this photo but this is the point at which the viaduct passes over the eastbound District Line.
(The two inner and most obviously visible tracks are the Piccadilly line ones. The rail in the very bottom right of the photo belongs to the District Line westbound).

The viaduct was reconstructed here, in the early 1930s, to allow for one of the extra tracks for the Piccadilly Line extension to pass beneath it (even though the new extra track was used for the District Line). The decision to reconstruct the viaduct seems a strange one considering that it hadn't been used for passenger traffic since 1916 (the line was closed completely only a few years later).

 

 

A different view showing the separation of the eastbound District Line more clearly.

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

 

 

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When the District Line was extended west from Hammersmith in 1877, it used the LSWR rails to Richmond, joining them at Studland Road Junction, just west of Hammersmith station. This point (and the remains, as seen here, of the viaduct carrying the original LSWR line) can still be viewed from passing trains.

The line was electrified in 1906 and doubled up with a non-electrified line in 1911. Although the District Line was proving very successful, it was clear that the LSWR (and the Metropolitan and GWR routes along it) was not, so the non-electrified line proved to have a short service life (until the arrival of the Piccadilly Line).

 

 

 

 

 

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When the Piccadilly line was also extended westwards from Hammersmith (in 1932), two new extra tracks had to be built from Hammersmith station to the point at which the old LSWR tracks could be intercepted. The two new tracks were built on the outer sides of the existing District ones (the northern most one was actually built on the other side of the old LSWR viaduct).

The original District Line tracks (the inner ones) from Hammersmith to Studland Road junction are now used by the Piccadilly Line. The train shown here (moving away from the camera) is a westbound District Line one. The current eastbound District Line is separated from the other tracks by the viaduct.

For a LSWR sign still in situ on one of the bridges, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Westward view from the northern side of the viaduct showing the merging of the track areas (and Ravenscourt Park station) in the distance. The added-on nature of the track in the foreground is apparent here (the eastbound District line track).

(photo: 2006)

 

 

 

 

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The track to nowhere: eastward view showing the course of the original route as it passes over the eastbound District line track.

(photo: 2006)

 

 

View from Ravenscourt Park station of the original route of the line (the grassy bank). The foreshortening effect of the telephoto lens makes it seem that the original viaduct takes a lift-off trajectory but it is actually the newer tracks that take a dip down toward Hammersmith station.

(photo: 2008)

 


(Photos taken between 1977 and 1981, except where stated.) 


 

Stamford Brook - South Acton